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The Pastor’s Page™

Rev. Brian Eastman was called to serve as the pastor of Beaver UCC in August of 2008. Brian received his Master of Divinity degree from Andover Newton Theological School (Newton, MA). He has worked as a seminarian at Second Church of Newton UCC (Newton, MA) and as a chaplaincy intern at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital (Boston, MA). While at seminary, Brian also co-founded the Andover Newton Men’s Fellowship, worked in Theology and the Arts, traveled to China to study World Christianity, and was inducted into the Jonathan Edwards Society of Andover Newton. Prior to his calling to ministry, Brian received a Bachelor of Science degree from Guilford College (Greensboro, NC) in Physics. After college, Brian worked in Information Technology, working for academic institutions, large corporations, and dot-com startups. Other areas of ministry and theology that interest Brian are Science and Religion, Theology and the Arts, World Christianity, and serving the greater community through ecumenical work between churches. Pastor Brian currently lives in Dayton with his wife Amelia.

A visit from Pastor Brian

If you would like Pastor Brian to visit with you, or if you know someone that would enjoy a visit for any reason, please contact Pastor Brian. You may email Pastor Brian or call Pastor Brian at (937) 469-1383 at any time.

Pastor’s Office Hours

Tuesday: 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Wednesday: 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Thursday: 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

The Pastor’s Peace™

Inspirational thoughts from Pastor Brian for your reflection and consideration, published monthly during the year, available in our printed Beaver Church Chatter newsletter and on our web site.*

2018

  • January

    If we look back at the news for 2017, we would see many headlines pointing to destruction, death, and heartache. From the hurricanes, flooding, and fires, to the tragic shooting in Las Vegas, it has been a difficult year to say the least. As we round out the year we are worried about the economy and politics, worried about North Korea, and probably worried about much more then I could ever write in an article. Some years are obviously better then others, and there have surely been worse years than this one, but if you are closing out 2017 with a bit of anxiety, I don’t blame you.

    Despite all of the tragedy there have also been great things this year, and reasons to celebrate. I know in my own life I have had several blessings this year and it goes to show that all of us have lives that are combinations of good and bad. Even in the bad, however, there are signs of good. If we look at the very same tragedies that I spoke about before, you will see examples of bravery, kindness, compassion, and love. One of my favorite stories of the year was about bakery workers who were trapped in their bakery for several days during the flood in Houston. Instead of focusing on fear and doubt, they decided to use their time to bake mountains of bread that was then handed out to those in need after the waters began to recede. Even in the worst of times the love of God can shine through.

    We were, of course, recently reminded of this during the Advent season leading up to Christmas. In this time we acknowledge the darkness while at the same time looking for the light of Christ that can shine in any darkness. This culminates in the celebration of the incarnation of God through the birth of Christ. The birth of Christ along with his resurrection are signs of hope that we remember each and every year through Christmas and Easter. This hope, however, is not confined to these seasons, but rather is a hope and a light that we can take with us throughout the year and throughout our lives. I hope that you had a good Christmas this year, and that despite any difficulties there was joy. As we continue into the New Year together let us remember that the hope and joy of Christmas comes with us into whatever awaits us in the months ahead. Together we can share the love of God with each other and the world. We can share that love in good times, but also in times of hardship, because the light of Christ shines on no matter what. In this New Year look for that light, and share that love.

    Peace and Happy New Year,

    Pastor Brian

  • February

    Well, I have to say that 2018 has been off to a bit of a lackluster start. I really shouldn’t complain, because the things that are truly important are going well for me. It is just that the weather, and sickness, and other inconveniences of life have been a bit more distracting than usual. As I write this it is snowing yet again, and yet again, I am thinking about church this Sunday and whether or not people will be able to make it. I will certainly be looking forward to Spring this year.

    As I said already, however, I really don’t have much to complain about. I have a roof over my head, food, a great wife, my health, and a cute dog. What else do I really need? That is the thing about happiness and contentment though. Even when we seemingly have all we really need, we sometimes feel as if it is not enough. Many companies selling things would love you to feel that way as well. They will tell you that some new object (car, or food, or whatever) is going to be that thing that does provide happiness and contentment--but it won’t. You might feel joy for a bit, but if you have the essentials of life covered, and you still don’t feel some level of contentment, then new shoes aren’t going to fix that.

    All of this is, of course, somewhat tied to expectations and what we feel equals success or how we feel others judge us. This is one area that we can turn to Christ for, even though we don’t talk about that as much. We are usually focused on salvation and forgiveness, but knowing that we are loved by God, and that we are OK as we are, is of great importance, too. Understanding that we are good and precious children of God and that, other than the basics, we don’t need anything else for happiness is a hard concept. No matter how many times we are told that, we often feel like we are somehow missing out on things.

    Ironically, it is not wealth or status or power, all of which are hard to obtain, that can provide true happiness in life. Happiness can only be given by something we all already possess, and that is ourselves. Letting ourselves be content with what we have and who we are is something that is truly liberating, and it doesn’t cost a dime. For 2018 I know that I am going to try to work on this some more, and I encourage you to do so as well. All things are possible through God, including happiness, and it might take a lot less than we think.

    Peace and Blessings,

    Pastor Brian

  • March

    I have to say, it has not been such a great winter. We have had losses of loved ones, several serious illnesses, surgeries, and general difficulties with many of our members. This just covers what has happened in our congregation. The news of our nation and world has been a challenge as well: school shootings with tragic losses of life, brutal winter storms, stock market and economic concerns, and the ever present fear of regimes such as Russia and North Korea. It is easy to fall into despair and lose sight of hope when such things surround us. I myself have struggled to keep a positive attitude during the past weeks and months; however, these things do not define our existence.

    I was reminded of that one Sunday in March. As I gave the children’s moment, watched the smiles of the kids, and listened to their cute and insightful answers to my questions, I was overcome by joy. No matter what was happening in the world around me, the joy of those children was not diminished that day. These kids bring joy in the present, but are our future as well, representing the hope of new life and becoming the people that will work to make this world better for all of God’s creation. During Easter we speak of new life. We often think of this in terms of Christ’s resurrection and the eternal life we share with Christ through that event. This is central to our faith and the message of Easter, but God is also bringing forth new life, new opportunity, and new reasons for hope in the here and now.

    That same Sunday was also the first day I got to see a new addition to the church, a small baby boy born this winter. In the midst of the hardship I was surrounded by, there was this literal new life being brought into the world by God. In this boy there is so much potential for a future that I cannot even fathom and will likely not get to fully see, in this life at least. This is but one example of God bringing forth new things. If we look in the world we can find so many other examples. For me hope is recognizing all of the good and potential in the world around me and having faith that it will ultimately overcome the darkness. Perhaps not today, perhaps not tomorrow, perhaps not even in my life, but someday God’s kingdom will come into its fullness.

    This Easter season remember that the new life of Christ is not only about an event thousands of years ago, it is not only about the life eternal we share, but it is also about the new life coming into our world each and every moment of each and every day. See that new life and have hope.

    Peace, Hope, and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • April

    I have to say, it has not been such a great winter. We have had losses of loved ones, several serious illnesses, surgeries, and general difficulties with many of our members. This just covers what has happened in our congregation. The news of our nation and world has been a challenge as well: school shootings with tragic losses of life, brutal winter storms, stock market and economic concerns, and the ever present fear of regimes such as Russia and North Korea. It is easy to fall into despair and lose sight of hope when such things surround us. I myself have struggled to keep a positive attitude during the past weeks and months; however, these things do not define our existence.

    I was reminded of that one Sunday in March. As I gave the children’s moment, watched the smiles of the kids, and listened to their cute and insightful answers to my questions, I was overcome by joy. No matter what was happening in the world around me, the joy of those children was not diminished that day. These kids bring joy in the present, but are our future as well, representing the hope of new life and becoming the people that will work to make this world better for all of God’s creation. During Easter we speak of new life. We often think of this in terms of Christ’s resurrection and the eternal life we share with Christ through that event. This is central to our faith and the message of Easter, but God is also bringing forth new life, new opportunity, and new reasons for hope in the here and now.

    That same Sunday was also the first day I got to see a new addition to the church, a small baby boy born this winter. In the midst of the hardship I was surrounded by, there was this literal new life being brought into the world by God. In this boy there is so much potential for a future that I cannot even fathom and will likely not get to fully see, in this life at least. This is but one example of God bringing forth new things. If we look in the world we can find so many other examples. For me hope is recognizing all of the good and potential in the world around me and having faith that it will ultimately overcome the darkness. Perhaps not today, perhaps not tomorrow, perhaps not even in my life, but someday God’s kingdom will come into its fullness.

    This Easter season remember that the new life of Christ is not only about an event thousands of years ago, it is not only about the life eternal we share, but it is also about the new life coming into our world each and every moment of each and every day. See that new life and have hope.

    Peace, Hope, and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • May

    As I write this Pastor’s Peace it is the middle of April, and this past Monday, April 16th, it actually snowed in Dayton, Ohio. We are less than 60 miles from Kentucky, for heaven’s sake. If I wanted this kind of weather, I would have stayed in Boston. As I write this, it is actually a toasty 48 degrees in Boston, as compared to the 37 degrees that it is here. There in no way this should be the case, but things don’t always go as we would like. I guess I shouldn’t complain too much. I looked up weather statistics for Dayton, and in 1923 we actually got half an inch of snow on May 9th! Let us hope it will be a better year than 1923.

    Despite the fact that I would like it warmer, and that it usually is, the fact of the matter is that it is still cold and there is not much I can do about it. There are times in our lives that things drag on longer than we would like, or we seem to have to wait forever for something to come to pass. This is true of weather, finances, health issues, relationships, and most things it our life. Having patience is not always easy; perhaps that is why they call it a virtue. Patience is defined as “the capacity to accept or tolerate delay, trouble, or suffering without getting angry or upset.” It does not mean that we are pleased with the delay in our life; it just means that we do not let it control our lives or our reactions.

    When I think about Jesus, I think that he must have been one heck of a patient person. I think of all of the people who just didn’t get it, even the disciples. All of the times he had to repeat himself, and give the same lesson in a different way, would drive most people nuts, but Jesus just calmly performed his ministry. We often talk about trying to show the love of Jesus, which is most important, but we should perhaps also emphasize the patience of Jesus. We should try to be patient with the world around us and especially be patient with each other, as Christ was. Perhaps it was Christ’s divinity that allowed him to be so patient, but I like to think that it was also his faith and hope. He had faith in the future, always, despite the present. This I think can be a lesson for us. We should dwell less on what is not going the way we want and try to have faith in a better future, some would even call it hope.

    It does not mean we will always get what we want, but as was shown in the miracle of Easter, sometimes the future holds blessings beyond our wishes or even understanding. As we continue into the Easter season, remember the love of Christ and the gift of Christ’s salvation, but also remember Christ’s faith and patience.

    It does not mean we will always get what we want, but as was shown in the miracle of Easter, sometimes the future holds blessings beyond our wishes or even understanding. As we continue into the Easter season, remember the love of Christ and the gift of Christ’s salvation, but also remember Christ’s faith and patience.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • June

    In the past few weeks we have heard a great deal about the peace process involving North Korea. Politics aside, many are hoping that something does come out of all this that creates lasting peace on the Korean peninsula. Even though active fighting ended in 1953, there has been an armistice and not a peace treaty since then, meaning that North and South Korea have technically been at war for almost 68 years. I can’t even imagine what it is like to live in Seoul and have an active hostile military force present less than the distance from Cincinnati to Dayton. Things are quite difficult for most in North Korea as well, which begs the question: Why has it been this way for 68 years?


    The simple answer most would point to is the fact that North Korea has been ruled by dictators during that time period, but surely even for them a more prosperous North Korea would be a benefit. Or would it be? I think this is the challenge to peace. We feel as if we often have to give something up to achieve it. For many, what we have to give up does not seem to outweigh the benefit of peace. Perhaps we don’t value peace as much as we should. It is something that Jesus spoke of many times, and he is even called the Prince of Peace. In the world of conflict and war that he lived in, such dedication to peace would have seemed strange. The idea of turning the other cheek, or feeding your enemy is hard to accept now, let alone then.


    Was Jesus out of touch with reality? I think rather that Jesus was in touch with a different reality than we are. To Jesus, the most important things were life and love, love of God and love of each other. To Jesus, things such as possessions, land, pride, being right, power, wealth, dominance, and even personal safety were of little importance in comparison. Our issue with peace and the difficulty in achieving it is wrapped up in placing value on all of these things that Jesus did not. Being a Christian is not easy; Christ calls us all to many things and calls us to carry a cross of sacrifice as well. This idea of prioritizing life and love above all else is perhaps one of the more challenging things we are called to do, whether we realize it or not.

    I hope and pray that the peace process currently unfolding does lead to a lasting peace. I pray this for every life on the Korean peninsula, and for all of our servicemen and servicewomen constantly in harms way involved in this conflict. May Christ’s priorities reign and not the priorities of man, and may we have peace at last.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • July

    The other day I was cooking dinner at home. The kitchen was hot, and it was late, and I was trying to rush things so that I could finish, sit down, relax, and enjoy dinner. I just had one final topping to chop up, and about half way through the chopping I made a mistake. Chop, chop, chop, ouch, oh my God, and some other words I can’t publish in a church newsletter. I had been doing things too quickly and had sliced up a pretty big chunk of my thumb. I am mostly fine now, after some vigorous cleaning of the wound, and use of super glue, great for keeping wounds closed by the way. In addition to saying all those bad words I can’t publish, I remember being very angry with myself. I thought I was so stupid to rush things and now, at best, dinner was going to be pretty cold, and at worst I would be going to the emergency room; thankfully not.

    This is not the first time I have beaten myself up about something, and/or regretted my actions after the fact. We all experience regret and self-criticism of our actions from time to time. The question is, however, did any of that anger directed at myself really help anything? The answer of course is no. Once the deed had been done, being angry about it really does not change anything. Learning from my mistakes and making different decisions in the future is helpful, very helpful in fact, but self-loathing never accomplished anything good. This is important to remember not only when you cut yourself cooking, but for the many ways we make mistakes, some much more serious than a knife wound.

    Christ offers us forgiveness for our actions against others and ourselves. Christ does not want us to go around in constant regret, constant guilt, and thinking that we are no good as people. In the Bible Jesus speaks of repentance and forgiveness. In the act of repentance we admit what we have done, take responsibility for it, and try not to repeat the action in the future. These are the steps that are truly helpful after a mistake, and these are the things that Jesus calls us to do. Feeling guilt and self-hate after an event that we cannot change is not what Jesus calls us to. Guilt is what is forgiven through Christ and in return we strive to be better, to be the children of God we are made to be. So as you live life, take your time and don’t rush (trust me), try to live the life God calls you to, and if you make a mistake along the way, take a deep breath, take responsibility, accept the forgiveness of Christ and strive to be better in the future.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • August

    As many of you know, one of our church members recently competed in the Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle and won a gold medal playing with the Ohio team in the softball competition. When he showed off his medal to the church, I’m sure it was such a great feeling to have the church be so happy for his accomplishment. We sure were proud and it was a great example of people coming together to lift up and give thanks for our joys and blessings. I think that the Special Olympics is truly a fantastic organization. Started by Eunice Kennedy Shriver in 1968, as an expansion of a camp she had organized in the early 60s, the Special Olympics has grown from an event with 1,000 athletes held in Chicago, to a global partnership of organizations providing over 100,000 events a year for 5 million athletes across 172 countries. All of this came from Eunice’s belief that physical activity and participating in sports was crucial for those with mental disabilities.

    There was a time when such things would never be considered. Anyone with disabilities, mental or otherwise, was given little respect or opportunities. When I think of the ministry of Jesus, I think about all of the people that Jesus went to and spent his time with. He helped the disabled, the poor, the outcast, children, the elderly, foreigners, sinners, and everyone else who was deemed unimportant by their society at the time. To Jesus these people were very important; they were his brothers and sisters, and children of God.

    This is an important lesson for us to remember. Everyone is important, and everyone has something to offer the world in the eyes of God. I think of all of the wonderful accomplishments of those participating in the Special Olympics, of how they are given a stage to exhibit their great worth, and I think that this is the type of work Christ has called us to do. All of us go through the world and are given opportunities to share God’s love and encouragement with those who need it. If we simply care for and about others, we can truly help create positive change in the world.

    Whether our work lifts up over 5 million people like Eunice Kennedy Shriver, or it lifts up just one, any work done for the love of another is worthwhile. Working together, we can help each other realize our full potential as the beautiful creations of God that we all are.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • September

    As summer is coming to an end, I find myself reflecting back on the last several months. There were many happy events, like VACATION (just kidding.) There were indeed some great things like baptizing Clyde, Luau Sunday, the bike stop, and the nice party for Byron and Anne, to name a few. Unfortunately there were things hard to deal with as well, such as all of the funerals I performed this summer. Sadly, we have lost several church members and family members over the last number of months. In fact, I have performed at least one funeral a month, sometimes two, since March of this year. I am hoping and praying that the months ahead will bring a break from mourning those whom we have lost, but we are never in control of such things.

    Funerals are something we don’t really like talking about. We are happy to talk about weddings, baptisms, celebrations, and positive visions of the future, but funerals are not something we tend to bring up, even though they are an important part of the church, perhaps the most important. Every time we face the loss of a loved one, we face the cross, and know the sting of death. One option is to ignore it, certainly a popular one; the other, however, is to let these signs of the cross remind us of the resurrection to come. We do a great number of things at church, but at the heart of it all is the faith that we have salvation and life eternal in Christ. Every time we come together in loss, we come together to mourn, but we also come together to understand the reality of death and deepen our faith in a life after this one.

    Christ did many things during his ministry: he helped the poor, he healed the sick, and he included those that others had cast out, but most of all he brought the Good News. The beginning of the earliest gospel written, Mark, starts with talk from the prophets that speaks of a messenger that is sent by God to lead us forward. That messenger is Christ, and the place we are being led is eternal salvation. That is the Good News. We no longer need to fear death, for in Christ we share in the resurrection, and no cross is ever the end. In the moment of loss, it is hard to remember these things, but as we all reflect over the last many months, let us remember the faith we have, and let that faith guide us from sadness to hope, and from hope to joy, joy that all of us will be connected eternally in Christ, and that nothing can ever take that from us.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • October

    We recently had a surprise birthday party for one of our church members who was hitting a large milestone. I won’t say how large: you never tell a lady’s age after all. We had all gathered at a local pizza place, and her nephew had brought her there saying he just wanted to buy her dinner, or something like that. When she walked through the door, everyone yelled happy birthday, and she jumped about 3 inches off the ground. We had around 30 people show up to celebrate with her, and we had a great time doing it. It was one of the many wonderful events that I love so much at this church.

    As I looked around at the crowd that showed up for this party, I took note of all of the different ways that it was a diverse group. We had people there aged from 9 to 91, and everything in-between. We had people who were born right down the street and people who were born half a world away. We had veterans, retired people, and those still working. We had people who dealt with disabilities such as the need for a cane or a wheel chair. We had people related to the birthday girl, although most there were not. We had Republicans, Democrats, Independents, and probably even a few Libertarians peppered in for good measure. I’m sure we had people who voted for Trump, and people who voted for Clinton, and folks who voted for some other candidate. We had people who were in a higher income bracket, and those who didn’t take home much at all. I could keep going, but the point is, in those 30 people there were many ways in which we were different, and yet we had all come together to celebrate an event for someone we loved and cared for. We were a family that evening, as we are every Sunday, a family in Christ.

    If we look at the ministry of Jesus, one thing we see again and again is that he reaches out to so many types of people. Jesus does not stick to people just like him. He interacts with and helps the rich and the poor, and those who are Jewish and those who are not. He doesn’t even let such standards as purity laws keep him from sharing God’s blessings with a people in deep need of such grace. Jesus breaks all of these boundaries, because he knows that he is called not just to some of humanity, but to all of humanity, as all of us are children of God.

    There are so many ways, especially now, that the world tries to tell us that we are different, and therefore cannot come together or get along; however, that is just not the truth. We are all connected, and we are all much more similar to each other than we can possibly imagine. If Jesus was willing to cross boundaries in the name of God’s love, then perhaps we can as well.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • November

    As I write this I am getting ready to head out to Denver, Colorado. For those that didn’t know I was invited to perform the wedding of Byron and Annie Kulander’s son Chris. Most everyone reading this will, of course, know Byron and Annie, but for the few who don’t, they are long-time church members that have moved to Texas to be closer to their son. Of course, everyone here misses them terribly, but we all understand that as we get older things change and we must make accommodations. I have enjoyed them both so much over the years, and they are just two examples of some of the fantastic people I have met along the way here at Beaver Church.

    I recently celebrated 10 years of serving as the pastor of Beaver Church, and I guess that is one reason I am waxing poetic about the people here. There are so many I have met, so many I have married, baptized, and buried in my time here. As I reflect on the church, I would have to say that it truly is the people of the church that have inspired me over the years and made me feel as if I am doing good ministry here. Of course, the church itself is pretty, and I have grown to like Beavercreek and the Dayton area very much, but without the people, it would be nothing. In fact the word for church in Greek from the New Testament is “Ekklesia”, which actually means a people called together. Buildings and fixed locations are not required at all to have a church. Not only have I enjoyed meeting and knowing so many people over the years, but also they have all helped to form me into the person and minister I am today. How truly important our human relationships are; they are the things that make up our very beings.

    Perhaps this is why Jesus focuses so much on people, individuals, and every type of person he meets along the way. He does not seem interested in things, or the institutions of this world but rather in each and every person he meets, from the Roman officer to the blind beggar. In the end Jesus teaches us that everyone truly is important, and that everyone deserves love and compassion. Part of being the church is understanding that, and opening our hearts to so many types of people all called together, and those yet to be called. For me I know that opening my heart to all of you has been one of the best gifts I have received, and I pray that the fellowship we have together has been such a gift for all of you as well.

    Peace and Blessings,
    Pastor Brian

  • December

    Well, as I write this the Christmas decorations are already up everywhere you look. At the Salvation Army Kroc center where I work out, they had the Christmas tree up before Veteran’s Day. With the rate we are going, pretty soon we won’t know if kids are trick-or-treating on Halloween or if they are Christmas caroling. Now the rush of Christmas is a subject I have complained about many times. I feel we overlook Advent, and we forget there are 12 days of Christmas, the 25th of December being only the first.

    I’m sure our rush towards Christmas is somewhat influenced by the consumerism of the holiday with stores and online retailers hoping for Christmas sales as early as possible. For many retail businesses the Christmas season is what determines profitability or loss. I do think, however, that the desire to celebrate Christmas early is about more than just the presents. I think that for many, Christmas represents a time where families get together, people take a break from work, and that hopefully the things that really matter in our lives are highlighted instead of put aside. In such a worldview perhaps the whole year before Christmas represents our Advent and thus we eagerly look forward to November as a time we can start to look for that light in the darkness.

    At its very core that is what Christmas is really about, light in darkness. For almost everyone there is some type of darkness in our life. There is loss, regret, guilt, and suffering just to name a few. Coming together and celebrating Christmas does not fix those things overnight, but doing so does remind us that there is something that is greater than all those things. Our faith in Christ reminds us that Christ transcends all, and that nothing, not even death itself, can separate us from God’s love and God’s family. It is only when we are reminded of this, when we have faith in it, that we can start the journey of moving beyond the darkness of our life into the light that is the promise of Christ.

    So, this Christmas season, if you find yourself in early November putting up decorations and getting ready for Christmas because you want to impress your neighbors, well maybe you want to pray on that. If, however, you find yourself decorating because you need that hope for something beyond the despairs of life, you go ahead and decorate your heart out.

    Anytime of the year, any day, any hour, is a good time to look for the light of Christ. Our savior is with us not just on Christmas and Easter, but on every day of the year. Christ is there reaching out with comfort, love, and compassion. Look for that this Christmas, look for that light, and carry it with you each moment of your life.

    Peace, Blessings, and Merry Christmas

The Pastor's Peace™ Archive

Read Pastor Brian's thoughts from past years. Coming Soon

The Pastor’s Sermon™

Listen to Pastor Brian’s Sunday Sermon recorded during Morning Worship.

The Pastor's Sermon™ Archive

Listen to Pastor Brian’s Sunday Sermon from past years. Coming Soon

The Pastor's Peace™ and The Pastor's Sermon™ are ©2018 by The Beaver United Church of Christ and Pastor Brian Eastman. If you wish to copy or reproduce any content from the Beaver United Church of Christ web site, please contact Pastor Brian Eastman.